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FOSSILS CURATED FOR INTERIORS AT AUCTION

 

 

Welcome to The Fossil Store report and the fossils in auction scene and specifically the trend in the city of London. Once again fossils surpass auction estimates as surmounted ammonites originally created by The Fossil Store prove to have enormous appeal and attract investment longevity in the capital city. Creating a stir at Christie's fine art auctioneers, Knightsbridge, London, recently in the Natural History section a Benjamin Allison surmounted ammonite realised a whopping £8125.00GBP. The hammer price result among a mixed bag of 90 other lots, where the auctioneers saw only fourteen lots bought back in. Fossils generally were the strongest element of the auction of fossils and minerals, the mineral section did not fare as well, four fossil lots remained unsold against ten unsold minerals lots. The auction was fairly equally split between 44 mineral lots and 45 fossil lots. In the fossil section were offered seven Moroccan fossil which all got away with strong results from the auctioneers rostrum on the day, the Moroccan fossils continuing to produce a wealth of appeal in bold authoritative natural art from that corner of North Africa.

 

 

As fine art remains buoyant in an uncertain market once again fossils tag along as the alternative investment. Traditional investment favourites having been buffeted by the winds of mediocrity, fossils prove their worth. In the Christie's auction an ammonite, lot 182 which was originally mounted by Benjamin Allison attained a £8125.00 hammer price over an estimate of £3,000.00 to £5,000.000 GBP. The lower estimate a cautionary one was overtaken with the zeal of an aggressive bidding saleroom. The peerless quality of Benjamin’s work apparent enough in the buyers final securing bid. This set another landmark at Christie's for The Fossil Store and Benjamin being exactly ten years, one month and twelve days since another landmark Moroccan ammonite of Benjamin’s reached the heady heights of £8,700.00 GBP (hammer price), at Christie's, the difference of six centimetres in height separating the two lots ten years apart.

 

Overall the auction provided excellent positivity towards the fossil industry, yes it is an art industry, the best rarities of the fossil market still attracting justified Interest. The rest of the sale breaks down to fossils reigning supreme over the mineral section. Forty four mineral lots with nearly a 25% bought in rate, against forty five fossil inclusions with less than a ten 10% bought in rate. A respectful aggregate of around 17% bought in overall. With an incredible 29 lots cresting over the highest estimate. The clear message is that there is life in an old dog yet, after millions of years and a fresh look at natures cupboard we see an established fossil market growing from strength to strength over the last two decades and we foretell the trend will continue for the foreseeable future.

 

As Sir David Attenborough reaches a milestone in his career and we do salute Sir David here, natural history collecting in all its forms is recognised as perhaps one of the most important and influential forces of the early twenty first century. In the early twentieth century it was the age of discovery, the spotlight on the likes of Scott, Amundsen and Howard Carter in the news of the day, we are now in the new millennium focussing on the nature of our planet and what we can do to support it and preserve it for future generations. Looking back into the past is a good way to move forward with knowledge and understanding. Prehistoric life is one small element of our world, the liberation of fossils and the continued availability to study them in any environment, these wonderful anomalies of nature, is surely not a negative purpose and can only make us all aware of where we came from and where were are going.